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Our Diamond Edge 320 Review

Here we'll discuss the Diamond Edge 320. We'll tell you what we like, what we don't like, and give you a "wrap up" summary at the bottom. It’s an interesting and unique bow—and it’s designed to outperform Diamond’s most popular bow, which would be the Infinite Edge—and there’s more to it than meets the eye, in our humble opinion.

Diamond Archery Edge 320 Bow Compound Bow - Black - 70 lbs, Left Hand
  • Compound bow is perfect for hunting, target shooting, or archery target practice
  • Diamond archery bow comes standard with R.A.K. equipped system hunting accessories
  • Versatile and adjustable components make hunting gear great for beginner or experienced archers

We’ll go over all the details below, but for those of you in the “my time is precious” camp—and we appreciate that—we’ll start with our summary conclusion before jumping into our Diamond Edge 320 review:

SUMMARY: The Edge 320 is one of Diamond’s top-of-the-line bows, and it features some pretty impressive measurements: it’s a got FPS of 320, a let-off of 80%, and generous brace height of 7.25, designed to cover for any imperfections in your shot. It’s more adjustable than many other high-end bows—always a plus—but the real standout on the model is the Bowtech Binary Cam System, designed to create a very smooth draw cycle (and add some of that FPS to your arrow). It’s also a little longer than other bows in the Diamond line, at 32 inches, which can provide some stability for shots at farther distancesand advantage when target shooting, but also when bowhunting. Overall, two strong thumbs up. 

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Ok, so there’s the overview. Let’s jump into the details:

Diamond Adjustability: One of the Their Main Draws (Ha)

"Draw..." Sorry about that. We couldn't resist.

This, perhaps, is the cornerstone of Diamond bows in the 21st Century: adjustability. It's been their main focus on each of their models, and it's allowed to them to create bows that are mass-market offerings: instead of making dozens of different bows in different draw lengths and draw weights, they can make a few adjustable bows, and let owners specify them to their own measurements.

The 320 continues in that effort, and it offers a draw length range from 15 inches to 31 inches. That's a wider range than most bows, and it makes it a great option for taller folks (which we talk about below, in the section titled "A Good Option for Tall People”—we'd suggest reading that section if you're 6-foot-3-inches or taller).

The draw weight ranges from 7 to 70 pounds, which is low enough for everyone from small kids getting their first bow, to veteran bowhunters who want to harvest elk. It's interesting to note that the 7- to 70-pound range, broad though it may be, isn't as broad as the range of the Diamond Infinite Edge, which has a draw range of 5- to 70-pounds. We're not certain, but we suspect that they needed to decrease that range in order to structure the bow so that it can have such a high FPS. But that's just a guess.

The Real Advantage: The Synchronized Binary Cam System

Even though there are other details that make this the top-of-the-line Diamond offering (for now, anyway!), the binary cam system on the 320 is probably one of its best features. It ups the FPS to 320, provides a really impressive let-off, and perhaps most importantly, is designed to offer a smooth, uninterrupted draw cycle that provides for flat nock travel.

Here's how they do all that, and why it's a big deal: the synchronized cams are designed to be both perfectly symmetrical and perfectly in tune, so that when you release the bow string, both cams move forward at *exactly* the same rate of speed. When both of those cams move in unison, the nock—and your arrow attached to the nock—can travel forward without any unwanted up/down motion (hence, the flat nock trajectory). That can provide you with more accuracy in your shots—and if you're a bowhunter, dinner on your table. Not only is it difficult to create a bow that features cams that travel in unison, it's also difficult from a production perspective—both of those cams need to be absolutely identical, which requires a sophisticated manufacturing process to create that precision.

So that's why it's a big deal, and why it's the unsung hero of the 320. There are other features that are a little more flashy, but it's the cams that make this a stand-out (and if we're being honest, it's almost always the cams that make a good bow and stand-out bow).

Diamond Archery Edge 320 Bow Compound Bow - Black - 70 lbs, Left Hand
  • Compound bow is perfect for hunting, target shooting, or archery target practice
  • Diamond archery bow comes standard with R.A.K. equipped system hunting accessories
  • Versatile and adjustable components make hunting gear great for beginner or experienced archers

A Longer Axle-to-Axle Length of 32 Inches

This, along with the brace height, is one of the more interesting aspects of the 320. The axle-to-axle length is 32 inches, which is a liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittle longer than you'll see on a lot of other hunting bows, and longer than you see on other Diamond bows.

Very often, bow hunters want as short-and-squat a bow as possible, because when you're trudging through the woods, you want your bow to be as manageable as possible. Ditto for sitting in a tree stand—you don't want a huge bow when the space you're sitting in is so tight. Shorter bows tend to provide less accuracy, but that's a trade-off a lot of hunters are willing to make. But—it *is* a trade-off, and after all, what's the point of having a bow that's easy to get through the woods, but won't allow you an accurate shot?

So, we like that this bow is a little longer. It provides a little more accuracy than you might find in other hunting bows, and in the grand scheme of things, a single inch isn't too much.

Brace Height: A Little Longer Than We'd Expect

As a general rule of thumb, bows with a shorter brace height shoot arrows that are faster but less accurate, and bows with a longer brace will do the opposite—shoot arrows that are a little bit slower but a little more reliable. The common term for this is "forgiveness"—bows with a longer brace height tend to be more forgiving. The brace height on the 320 is a little higher than you'll see on a lot of hunting bows, at 7.25 inches (in fact, it's higher than you'll see on the Diamond Infinite Edge and the Diamond SB-1, which both have a brace height of 7 inches)—so it may be a little more forgiving of imperfections in your draw cycle. We consider that a plus.

All these little details add up to a hunting bow that's a little larger than some of its peers—perhaps not by much, but a little—but one that's designed to provide more accuracy. We appreciate that sort of thing—after all, as bowhunters, we want to be as effective as possible, and a little extra accuracy is always welcome!

Best Let-Off and FPS for a Diamond

When you're looking for the differences between the 320 and the other bows in the Diamond line, here it is: the let-off and the FPS. These are where the bow really stands out.

The 85% is really getting up there—you're in the upper echelon of bows when you start to see 85% and 90%—and that 85% let-off is the highest let-off available in Diamond's Edge line of bows (at the time we wrote this post, of course! They may be cooking up something new as we speak). Let-off is great for everyone, but it's particularly great for bowhunters, as it can provide a lot of comfort when you're at full draw (especially if you've got the bow dialed all the way up to a 70-pound draw weight).

That FPS of 320 is also pretty good (and also currently the top performer in the Diamond line). There are a few bows that can shoot faster, but not by much.

A Good Option for Tall People

We discussed the draw length of this bow, and mentioned that it's a good option for tall folks. Here's why: you can elongate the draw length to 31 inches, which is good for people for people up to about 6-foot-6-inches tall. Many adjustable bows are adjustable up to a 30-inch draw length, which is good for folks up to about 6-foot-3-inches tall—so if you're taller than 6-foot-3-inches, this may be a good option.

Our Only Complaint…

…and this is true of a lot of bows, is that you may want to replace some of the comes-with-the-bow parts. The bow sight is functional, but not amazing; same for the stabilizer. They’re both absolutely usable—and with proper skill, you can target shoot or hunt with them to great success—but if you’re picky about all your gear, you may want to look for upgrades.

Well, we lied: we have two complaints—the other is the weight of the bow. At 3.6 pounds, it’s a little heavier than most other bows in the Diamond line, that clock in at 3.2 pounds—but honestly, we can overlook that.

Name: Why is It Called the 320?

If it didn't occur to you right off the bat (and we'll be honest—it didn't to us!), that "320" refers to the FPS measurement. It looks like Diamond really wants to emphasis that feature, that it shoots 320 feet per second. That's kind of a clever name—we're used to seeing "360" and "365" thrown around in product names, but not "320." That makes it memorable, in a way. That's not the most important thing to mention, probably, and neither is this next thing:

Not for Nothing, But It Looks Really Rad

Diamond makes some good-looking bows, in our humble opinion. Some manufacturers make incredible bows that can boast some great specs, but they look... kind of silly. The Raptor 32 comes to mind—great bow with some crazy specs, but a little odd-looking.

The 320 is just a serious-looking bow, with those aggressive oval-shaped cams, and the thinner-than-usual stabilizer—just a really solid-looking bow. We appreciate that kind of thing.

The Diamond Edge 320: Our Summary

This is the top-of-the-line Diamond offering, and we think it's a fantastic bow. It features everything good about the Diamond line: adjustability, the advanced cam system / smooth draw cycle, and a let-off you don’t really see much in bows of this tier. This is one of those bows that makes us feel very comfortable recommending Diamond products.

So there you go! Now it's up to you to decide. Good luck, have fun, and safe shooting!

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Diamond Edge 320 Review